The Bridges Assisted Living Part of Eagle Scout Project

The Bridges Assisted Living Community Recipient of Eagle Scout Project

The Bridges Assisted Living Community has been the extremely proud recipients of an Eagle Scout project involving the installation of a beautiful new flagpole in the front of our building. Alan Wolfe, the grandson of residents Florence and Dick Soens, is a freshman at Bloomingdale High School and Eagle Scout candidate. As is the case with all Eagle Scout service projects Alan was charged with the planning, fundraising, and completion of the flagpole project. And as all can now see upon entering the community, Alan did a wonderful job. And with solar powered light we will be able to enjoy seeing the American and Florida State flags waving throughout the day and night.

A special dedication was held on Memorial Day that included not only an opportunity to celebrate with Alan and his troop the completion of the flagpole project, but also allowed us the opportunity to acknowledge our resident veterans and their families; a truly special occasion indeed. Special guest and flag historian Robert St. John shared the of military branch flags, in addition to the history of the American flag. Resident veterans were photographed beside the military branch flag for which they served.

Many thanks to Alan for allowing The Bridges to take part in his very special accomplishment as he completes his journey to the rank of Eagle Scout, the highest rank in Boy Scouts. As such he exemplifies an individual that has upheld the Scout Oath and Law, demonstrated leadership and has provided service to his community.

Boy Scouts Troop help with Eagle Scout flag pole project.

Boy Scouts Troop help with Eagle Scout flag pole project.

Resident and veteran Larry Nanns and his wife Jean pose in front of the American and military flags.

Resident and veteran Larry Nanns and his wife Jean.

Veteran Dick Winslow stands proudly before the American flag.

Veteran Dick Winslow stands proudly before the American flag.

Senior Living Residents Benefit from Socialization

Coffee Club Offers Senior Living Residents
Opportunity to Socialize

A twice weekly Coffee Club provides an opportunity for residents at The Bridges Senior Living community in Brandon to gather and socialize over morning coffee and muffins. Activities Assistant, Christie Dyer, leads the group discussion. Topics range from current events to a “show & tell” format. A recent Coffee Club had attendees imagining and sharing their ideas of what various tools could be used for instead of for their intended purpose. This “game” generates interesting dialogue among the residents.

For some residents, it is the reminiscing and storytelling during Coffee Club that they enjoy the most. For others, it’s the socializing and comradery that keep them coming back. Whatever the reason for attending, the importance of regular and consistent socialization can be found in study after study. The Rush University Medical Center team discovered during their research project that elderly people with the highest levels of social activity showed much lower levels of cognitive decline than those who socialized infrequently.

At The Bridges Assisted Living, there are many opportunities to socialize with fellow residents. Our Calendar of Activities can be found by clicking http://bridgesretirement.com/calendar/.

Assisted living residents enjoy socializing during Coffee Club.

Assisted living residents enjoy socializing during Coffee Club.

Elderly Need to Stay Hydrated

The Importance of Staying Hydrated in the Elderly

Dehydration is the most common fluid and electrolyte concern for the elderly. Dehydration can cause urinary tract infections, medications toxicity, impaired cognition, increased falls, constipation, and acute confusion.

Early warning signs of dehydration are: dry skin, dizziness, fatigue, dark colored urine, headaches, dry mouth or nose, thirst and cramping. Many times older seniors can become so dehydrated that the classical signs may be misleading or absent. This situation may lead to hospitalization.

The body’s water amount can decrease by 6 liters in adults between the ages of 20 and 80 years old. With this loss the body is much more susceptible to dehydration. It is important to encourage elderly individuals to drink small amounts throughout the day. A recommended amount is five (8 ounce) glasses of water daily.

Drinking water helps maintain the function of kidneys and bodily fluids, helps energize muscles and keeps skin looking good.

Assisted Living Residents Walk For Health

Assisted Living Residents Walk for Health

The “Sunshine Walking Group” is a regularly scheduled activity that is part of The Bridges Assisted Living community’s newly implemented “Your Bridge to Wellness” program. Several times a week, assisted living resident gather in the first floor lobby as they eagerly await the start of the group walk led by Gary Lenza, the wellness program coordinator. Residents begin single file or side-by-side and walk at a pace that is comfortable for them. Gary encourages our seniors to take short breaks and drink water to remain hydrated. So, why do these folks who are 65 years of age and older commit to a walking group? They realize that the benefits of walking on a regular basis will positively affect their overall health.

If you want to stay healthy and mobile well into old age, start walking today—even if you’ve already edged into “old age.” That’s the conclusion of a report from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) trial, published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The trial included more than 1,600 men and women between the ages of 70 and 89. None exercised regularly, and all were relatively frail. Half were randomly assigned to an exercise program that included daily walking plus strength and balance exercises. The other half took part in education workshops on healthy aging that included some gentle stretching routines.

After 2½ years, the volunteers in the exercise group were 28% less likely to have become disabled (defined by the inability to walk about 400 yards without help) compared to those in the education group. They were also 18% less likely to have had any episode of physical disability.

The improvements, while promising, probably don’t capture the real benefit of exercise. That’s because some of the people in the workshops, who learned how exercise can lead to healthier aging, became more physically active on their own. If none of the workshop and stretch people exercised, the results of the structured program would have been more impressive. For more information about this study, visit http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/walking-exercise-helps-seniors-stay-mobile-independent-201405287173

Assisted Living Residents Walking Group

Riverview Assisted Living Appreciates Its Volunteers

Volunteers Add Value to Assisted Living Community in Riverview

At The Bridges Assisted Living community in Riverview, we have numerous volunteers with varying backgrounds who bring their talent, enthusiasm and heart to their volunteer jobs. During Volunteer Appreciation Week, The Bridges held a special brunch to celebrate and honor our special volunteers.

Music fills the room when musicians, such as Julian and Noah, play the piano several times a month. When PAWS for Friendship arrives, residents are eager to pet and hold the therapy dogs. For volunteers, like Terri and Karen, who work in the activities department, they are kept busy with Wii bowling, chair yoga, bingo, crafts, and special events. Volunteers from various churches give their time to pray with residents either individually or in a group.

There is no shortage of opportunities for volunteer involvement. Our residents enjoy, appreciate and look forward to spending time with our special volunteers.

Volunteers do not necessarily have the time; they just have the heart. – Elizabeth Andrew

Volunteers

New Wellness Program for Assisted Living Residents

Assisted Living Residents in Riverview Participate in New Wellness Program

Your Bridge to Wellness is a program specifically designed for assisted living residents to promote healthy living. A monthly schedule of fitness classes and mind game exercises provide our elderly residents the opportunity to reap the benefits of experiencing a healthy  balance of body and mind resulting in an overall feeling of well-being. The program has received an excellent response by our assisted living residents. Classes and activities scheduled include:

  • Balance & Tai Chi
  • Therabands & Hand Exercise
  • Mind Games & Familiar Faces
  • Chair Dancing
  • Chair Yoga
  • Name That Tune
  • Game Show
  • Walking Club
  • Wii Bowling
  • One-on-One Fitness
  • Sing-A-Long

To view the Wellness Calendar, click  http://bridgesretirement.com/calendar/